Who Invented the Internet – What Is the Future?

Before the Internet was actually the Internet, it was called ARPAnet. ARPA-Who? Yes, it’s a funny sounding name for sure. Especially considering what the Internet is today, literally encompassing every aspect of our lives. ARPAnet is an acronym for Advanced Research Projects Agency Network. In the late 1960s, The Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Department of Defense set out on a mission. They were trying to find a way to simplify communication and share data, but not using the old telephone method of ‘circuit switching’ to transfer voice and data communications. That method was only able to send from one to another in a linear fashion – from end to end.

The ARPAnet once set up, as rudimentary as it was in the beginning (late 70’s, early 80’s) used packet switching which enabled the sending and receiving of communication and data to multiple locations. Thus, TCP/IP communication protocols were born. You can probably thank Robert Kahn and Vint Cerf, often referred to as the Father of the Internet, for that. What started out as a defense project quickly expanded to the National Science Foundation (NSF) and academia – which allowed the sharing of information in real time. In 1989 ARPAnet was shut down, replaced by NSFnet.

First Commercial Use of the Internet

The first public and commercial use of the Internet came when in mid-1989 when Compuserve and MCImail added email service for anyone who wanted it. Next, PSInet setup a commercial section to the Internet backbone. Then by the end of 1990 Tim Berners-Lee came up with HyperText Transfer Protocols, and that should sound very familiar to everyone; HTTP. Next came; HTML, UseNet, and FTP (File Transfer Protocol). The Internet was up and running, and only in their wildest dreams would they have imagined that today just over 4 Billion people are now connected online across the globe – soon everyone will be connected and their lives affected in some way.

The Internet Has Changed the Way We Do Business Forever

Before the Internet, businesses were using fax machines, Federal Express package delivery and Zap Mail, Snail Mail (USPS), and very limited data transfer with Alpha Pagers (very brief text messages for which you could answer Y or N for yes or no). At that time people were upset with Junk Fax advertising, little did they know the future of SPAM was going to take a big bite out of that nonsense – albeit, only to make it a 1,000 times worse. Before SPAM blockers, users wore the letters off the “delete” key within a month after buying a new computer.

The Internet sped up the flow of information and the speed of business to the point that in 1999 Bill Gates wrote a book; Business @ The Speed of Thought. Of course, by the mid-1990s nearly every legitimate business, big and small, either had or was building a website. Why not have an online brochure available 24/7 without having to print and mail out information to potential customers? Yes, the printing industry suffered, print shops across the nation were going out of business, almost as fast as the film-developing sector disappeared with the advent of digital cameras.

The Major Evolutionary Shifts of Commercial Internet Use

Yes, the Internet has changed everything in our world, but nowhere is the shift as dramatic as it is in the business world. From 1990 to 2000, within 10-years everything had changed. It was a chaotic time, yet a time for significant opportunity. There is always opportunity in change. The more rapid the change the more chaos, crisis, and yes, opportunity. Below is a quick list of some of the paradigm shifts the Internet has brought to business;

  1. Commercial E-mail became the preferred method of written communication
  2. Companies, regardless of size, built websites – competing on a level playing field
  3. Interactive websites allowed customers and businesses to conduct business online
  4. Industry Portal Websites sprung up with information in every sector of the economy
  5. Search Engine competition rapidly evolved to serve the instant information needs of consumers
  6. Bulletin Boards then Blogs, brought 2-way open transparent information for business communication
  7. Social Networks and Social Business Networks began to grow
  8. The whole world went mobile with smartphones – the Internet followed – the rest is history

Today, the world’s information is at your finger-tips wherever you are and whenever you want it. Soon, the SpaceX LEO (Low Earth Orbit) Satellite Network System, Starlink will deliver Internet Service to anywhere on the planet, and anyone with a mobile device will be able to access the Internet. Well, that just changes everything, and here we go again. Are you ready for the next wave of opportunity/chaos, aboard the next satellite rocket launch? It’s already here, and deployed. It will come online in 2020. Once again, the Internet does not disappoint – change is the Internet’s only constant. Your business should be constantly exploiting these new technologies

What’s Comes Next? What’s the Next Big Evolution for Business Computing?

This turns out to be an easy one to predict, as industry and the world’s largest corporations are already preparing. Consider if you will The Internet of Things (IoT), Big Data, and AI (Artificial Intelligence) all connected in real time to the cloud, and all that secure data and information ready for anyone anywhere on any mobile device?

Imagine running a factory, supply chain, construction project, hospital, university, financial institution or multiple retail locations and having the exact pertinent information you need instantaneously? Imagine all those systems integrated, systematized, and optimally configured for maximum efficiency – on any job site, location, and the ‘need to know’ information for each team member in real-time.

From a business perspective, the Internet just got a 100-times more useful, but only if you take advantage of these changes and opportunities.

The Value Of Internet Radio

With the previous advancements of the compression of computerized audio files for easier transmission made by web pirates in the 80s, technology pioneer, Carl Malmud, founded the first internet radio station in 1993. With no other competition, it was simply called “Internet Talk Radio”. It was mostly comprised of entertaining interviews with key players of the science and technology industry. Since then, the growth of internet broadcasting has snowballed into the 21st century after a few musical concerts were broadcast live and music shook loose of its traditional radio roots and became “streamable”.

When internet broadcasters once needed their own servers and platforms, 365live.com changed the game, and newer, better technologies have emerged to offer anyone the opportunity to broadcast in a community. Now, this technology can be used on devices smaller than some wrist watches, such as on iPods and on smartphones. Apps such as Spotify, Apple Music, Google Music, and Pandora are among streaming music favorites and Slacker.com and Internet-radio.com for talk radio.

Why Does This Technology Matter So Much?

For a long period in radio’s history, you were told you could expect little change in the technology and the way the consumer used it. The 21st century had other plans. When once you had little choice of what you listened to and when, you now can completely tailor your listening experience. What, how, and when are all now within your control. You can support that which you personally believe in, rather than what agenda and advertising are being targeted at you. You can more closely engage with people you look up to and communities you want to join. It can be used as a tool to quickly transform your own mindset and life altogether.

The Opportunity It Presents

Not only do listeners stand to gain, but broadcasters just as easily reach their “tribe”, too. Business owners who choose to sponsor internet radio stations are also equally rewarded by being able to target such a specific audience with ads, guest spots, or shows of their own. If they are only advertising with traditional radio stations, they are in for a slim return because it only takes this 30-page report by Larry Miller of New York University’s Steinhart Music Business Program to understand that emerging listeners have no interest in technologies of the past.

The studies says “Generation Z, which is projected to account for 40% of all consumers in the U.S. by 2020, shows little interest in traditional media, including radio, having grown up in an on-demand digital environment”

High Speed Satellite Internet Access for Rural America

Do you feel the need for high speed Internet access and simply can’t get it? Not every home has access to DSL or Cable broadband Internet access services. In fact over 30 million people still can’t receive high speed Internet access. The costs of setting up DSL or cable access throughout the country, to each home, are in the billions of dollars. There are many promises that DSL or cable is coming, but when. Unfortunately it all boils down to economics, too few subscribers with too many miles. To many, satellite Internet access offers the solution. Satellite Internet service allows virtually everyone, anywhere to have access to lightning-fast broadband Internet access. There are two types of satellite Internet service, “one way” and “two way” systems.

With two way satellite systems the satellite dish sends and receives information over the Internet and delivers it your computer. The real benefit of a two way system is that you’re able to receive high speed access without tying up your phone line. Two way satellite service also give you an always on system. Download speeds can be as high as 1.5mpbs with upload speed about 128kbps.

One way satellite Internet access utilizes a dial up connection for upload page requests and offers similar download speeds of 256kbps to 1.5mbps. One way satellite Internet access is more reliable and economical than two-way satellite Internet services. It’s faster and more reliable because one way satellite Internet doesn’t experience the same time-out delays caused by “two-way” approach of uploading requests to the satellite. Satellites are really designed to broadcast and not receive information from small transmitters. One way satellite service takes advantage of satellite’s strengths by using it for downloading of information only. As you know, when you’re using a dial-up Internet service, your waiting time is based on downloading the information over your telephone line. The use of satellite Internet to download eliminates the problem.

If you are uploading tremendous amounts of information then a two way satellite system may be right for you. On the other hand, for average to moderate Internet surfers, one way satellite Internet access offers high speed that is reliable and much more affordable than two way access. Because of the simplicity and reliability, one way satellite Internet access is not regulated by the FCC. This gives the flexibility of choice of professional or self installation.

Put an end to your slow Internet access. Satellite Internet access may very well be the answer that you were looking for.